Recent Posts

Environmental Allergens That May Contribute To Seasonal Allergies & Asthma-agriculture

Environmental Allergens That May Contribute To Seasonal Allergies & Asthma

As the seasons change and spring is literally in the air, there are many factors contributing to the allergic disease such as pollen allergy. Pollen allergy is known to affect 50 million people in the U.S.  Nearly 30 percent of adults and 40 percent of children in the U.S. are affected. Worldwide, allergic rhinitis affects between 10% – 30% of the population. Studies in 2010, show that allergic rhinitis had been diagnosed through 11 million doctor visits. Allergies can point to danger signs such as anaphylaxis ( a life-threatening reaction), negative effects towards medicines, food and insect stings. Medicines are the most common allergen rooted to death. As the weather changes the environment starts to shift, many people start to develop allergies as a result of multiple interactions between the human immune system and the environment.

Environmental Allergens Contributing To Seasonal Allergies & Asthma:

Cigarettes

Cigarettes contain 4,000 chemicals, of which 69 are cancer-causing agents that irritate the throat, airways and lungs. These chemicals and noxious particles cause inflammation of the airways leading to the lungs, as well as an influx of immune cells to the airways. (1) Second hand smoke is just as dangerous as first hand smoke, as the toxins from the smoke are known to increase the risk of developing respiratory allergic reactions to non-smokers.

Dust

Dust particles are a form of waste materials and matter lying on the ground, on surfaces, or in the air. Dust mites are a common trigger to asthma in children. Your house doesn’t need to be visibly dusty or dirty to attract dust mite allergies. Particles may be too tiny to be able to remove in cleaning procedures. If you clean vigorously, this may not eliminate dust, but may end up stirring up the allergens and make symptoms worse.

Mold & Mildew

Molds and other fungi could trigger human health in forms of allergy, infection, and toxicity. An estimated 21% of current asthma is attributable to dampness/mold in homes (2) For instance, in Oregon when buying a home or renting, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) supports the law for protection against asthma and mold, floods and flooding, health and mold, homes and mold, indoor air regulations and mold, indoor air quality, large buildings and mold,  and schools and mold. With proper climate controlled environments and the proper air circulation the growth of mold or mildew can be minimized.

Pet Dander

Pet dander is dead skin cells from a warm-blooded animal that tends to have fur. Dander is a large trigger for allergen symptoms. Often times, pet dander is everywhere, even in people’s homes who do not own pets. This happens because pet dander clings to clothing. An example of this, can be caused from a pet itching, which the allergens become airborne and can affect someone near by.

Pollen

Environmental Allergens That May Contribute To Seasonal Allergies & Asthma-pollenPollen allergy may commonly be referred to as hay fever or allergic rhinitis. This specific reaction is caused by a type of pollen, linked to irritating responses such as, sneezing, stuffy nose, swollen eyes, watery eyes, or itchiness. Allergens can often trigger immune responses, like hives which often incorporate swelling of the skin, redness, or raised bumps that itch and spread over the surface of the skin.

Pollution

Environmental Allergens That May Contribute To Seasonal Allergies & Asthma-RefineryAir pollution such as sulphur dioxide, ozone, nitrogen oxides, occupational dust, organic and inorganic suspended particulate matter, tobacco smoke, etc., can cause an increase in airway reactivity through mechanisms dependent on or independent of specific IgE antibodies. By irritating the airways and skin, pollen grain penetration into the human body can increase. Defective permeability of tissue surface can increase the risk of infection. Air pollution may also increase the development of pollen allergy through a direct influence on the pollen grains (on their enzymes, plant growth etc.). (3)

Resources:

(1) Stevens, Danielle. “The Symptoms of Allergies to Cigarettes.” 06 May 2017. LIVESTRONG.COM. Leaf Group, 07 Sept. 2011. Web.

(2) Myers, Wyatt. “Top 6 Environmental Allergies.” 06 May 2017. EverydayHealth.com. N.p., 09 Sept. 2011. Web.

(3) Obtułowicz, K. “Air Pollution and Pollen Allergy.” 07 May 2017. Folia Medica Cracoviensia. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web.

Sources:

“AAFA.” 06 May 2017. Allergy Facts | AAFA.org. N.p., n.d. Web.

Hindawi. “The Relationship between Mold Exposure and Allergic Response in Post-Katrina New Orleans.” 06 May 2017. Journal of Allergy. Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 16 June 2010. Web.

Unknown Author, “Mold.” 07 May 2017. EPA. Environmental Protection Agency, 21 Feb. 2017. Web.

Myers, Wyatt. “Top 6 Environmental Allergies.” 06 May 2017. EverydayHealth.com. N.p., 09 Sept. 2011. Web.

Obtułowicz, K. “Air Pollution and Pollen Allergy.” 07 May 2017. Folia Medica Cracoviensia. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web.

Unknown Author, “Pet Dander Allergies Directory: Find News, Features, and Pictures Related to Pet Dander Allergies.” 06 May 2017. WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web.

Stevens, Danielle. “The Symptoms of Allergies to Cigarettes.” 06 May 2017. LIVESTRONG.COM. Leaf Group, 07 Sept. 2011. Web.

Healthy Living,

Jaclyn Rae

If you love this blog share it. Also, follow us on social media.